Book Review | Rebels Like Us by Liz Reinhardt

rebels like usAgnes Murphy-Pujols has just been uprooted from her active life in Brooklyn halfway through her senior year in high school to move with her Irish mother to a small town in Georgia while her brother attends the Sorbonne and lives with their Dominican father in Paris. Feeling like she got the raw end of the deal, Agnes is equally pissed at her mother for “cheating on” her father, despite their separation, and stressed out at having to deal with fitting in at a new school. Luckily, her looks and fiery personality draw the interest of ultra-popular Doyle and they flirt their way through the semester. The book’s focus becomes more racial when Agnes finds out about her new school’s tradition of segregated proms and tries to create change.

At nearly 500 pages, Rebels Like Us is one of the longest YA books I’ve encountered. The writing is solid and the characters well developed. It’s likely to please those interested in a romance novel with a few tangents. While the book bills itself as focusing on racial issues, those really take a backseat to the relationship between Agnes and Doyle. That said, their courtship does not seem to be given adequate attention as an inter-racial relationship. Some important issues are broached, which could serve as a catalyst for thought in some young minds, but nothing new or earth shattering is really presented. A shorter length may have worked better for this piece, which is a bit slow to get going and does seem to go on for a while. The novel could actually work well as the basis for a film. Check it out from a library near you!

I received an advance uncorrected proof of this book as a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. Thanks to the author/publisher for participating in the giveaway.

*If you’ve enjoyed reading Rebels Like Us, you may be interested in The Best Possible Answer by E. Katherine Kottaras (2016).

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Book Review | As Red As Blood by Salla Simukka

As Red As Blood, the first book in Simukka’s ‘Snow White’ trilogy, is described as a Nordic noir thriller and has sold over a million copies internationally. In the vein of Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, the book features a young female protagonist who finds herself sleuthing in the Finnish world of organized crime. This undercover operation takes place after a few school mates of hers stumble on a bloody bag of money and plan to keep it, leading to her attempted kidnapping.

While this is a young adult book, it could certainly be enjoyed by adults. That said, expect it to be written for slightly younger readers in the sense that a few things seem overly explained or redundant. I’m not sure if this is an issue with the translation or how the original text reads. The story is interesting enough, though it does seem unrealistic at times and certain coincidences are a bit much. The flow of the writing and active plot keep the book flowing, though the protagonist is the only developed character. It’s a quick read with entertainment value and would work well for teens who appreciate edgy but aren’t really excited about reading, reluctant readers. There are already plans in place for the film series. Check it out from a library near you!

I received an advance reader’s copy of this book as a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. Thanks to the author/publisher for participating in the giveaway.

Book Review | The Best Possible Answer (YA) by E. Katherine Kottaras

Due to be released November 1, 2016, Kottaras has written a fine second YA novel in The Best Possible Answer. This book relays a challenging summer for protagonist Viviana, a high school junior dealing with some heavy stress. In addition to boy troubles, APs and SATs, Viviana is also dealing with some intense family issues, school humiliation and panic attacks. Aided by her best friend Sammie, Viviana does her best to work through her issues toward the light at the end of the tunnel.

Listed as “One of Barnes & Noble’s Most Anticipated Contemporary YAs of Fall 2016,” this book is unsurprisingly good. The story dives right in from the very beginning and continues to hold the reader’s attention. Chapter breaks are frequent and well placed. The main characters are rounded out enough and allow the plot to flow smoothly. For a YA book I would give it 4/5 stars and say it addresses most issues quite well and provides a positive outlook on difficult situations. While some books easily transfer to other audiences, this one is topically best suited for young adults or perhaps college students. Watch for it to come to a library near you in November!

I received an advance uncorrected proof of this book as a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. Thanks to the author/publisher for participating in the giveaway.