Book Review | Fräulein M. by Caroline Woods

Fräulein M coverStep into 1920’s Berlin to see protagonist sisters Grete and Berni growing up in an orphanage. Fräulein M. shares their story as one sister moves into a Jewish owned flat to work at bars and the other becomes involved in work for the reich. Interwoven chapters allow the novel to include a storyline in 1970’s South Carolina where a young lady is hoping to learn about her mother’s sealed war-time experience. Do not be fooled by the cover image, this book is not about sex.

In this well-written historical fiction piece, Woods presents the lives of multiple characters successfully by focusing on how their actions affect each other. The novel flowed well despite the changing character focus. Berni’s transgender best friend was tastefully incorporated, adding value to the text. Chapters were of appropriate lengths, which allowed for pauses during the reading. This book would appeal to fans of historical fiction or women’s fiction. Check it out from a library near you!

I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. Thanks to the author/publisher for participating in the giveaway.

*If you’ve enjoyed reading Fräulein M., you may be interested in The Fortunate Ones by Ellen Umansky (2017). 

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Book Review | Oola by Brittany Newell

Focusing on the relationship between two young twenty-somethings, Oola is an interesting character study. Americans Oola and Leif meet each other at a friend’s party abroad and then bounce around the world house sitting for months before ending up in a cottage on the California coast. Their mostly solitary lifestyle is low key, with the story presenting different aspects of each character more actively than pursuing a plot. While there certainly is a plot, it does not seem to be as integral to the story as are the characters. Oola is a beautiful blonde Californian, while Leif is more loosely defined as he tries to find his identity in those closest to him.

I found it surprising that this novel was written by a college student, which shows again that age is not a determinant of good writing. The book kept my interest despite the plot’s sometimes slow nature. It was a realistic portrayal of a romantic boy meets girl and falls in love story, with oddities instead of being trite. The book would appeal to those recovering from a broken heart, those struggling with bisexuality or transgender issues, or those who enjoy reading of obsessive love. With the book just being released earlier this week, it should be arriving at your local library soon! I received an advance reader’s edition of this book as a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. Thanks to the author/publisher for participating in the giveaway.

*If you’ve enjoyed reading Oola, you’ll likely enjoy White Fur by Jardine Libaire (2017).