Book Review | O Glorious City : A Love Letter to San Francisco by Jeremy Fish

o glorious city cover.jpgAs the first artist in residence at City Hall in San Francisco, Jeremy Fish completed a series of 100 drawings in as many days. Through his agreement with the San Francisco Arts Commission, he worked on the pieces three days a week in his City Hall office for a commemorative project relating to City Hall’s 100th birthday. The book explains the project and shares the drawings and photo collages that Fish created during his residence.

Fish fans who are not already familiar with his background will enjoy reading about what brought him to San Francisco and how his career developed. His signature artwork is sure to create at least a few smiles, and accompanying text also provides some educational tidbits about San Francisco’s history. Perhaps on account of health issues encountered by Fish during his residence, some of the drawings lack full details like those often present in his pieces. Photo collages (drawings added on top of black and white photographs) may not be appealing to all fans hoping for more drawn art. It would be better to read a physical copy of this book instead of the ebook as it does not allow for zooming in on the artwork. Check it out from a library near you!

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Book Review | Twig by Madelon Phillips

twig_coverProtagonist Mattie is 18 years old at Twig‘s beginning and about to enter her third marriage. She has cold feet about marrying a man old enough to be her father, but is hopeful that love will grow between them. Mattie’s dead-set on becoming a mother, having already suffered a miscarriage during one of her previous marriages. During the novel, Mattie deals with the ups and downs of marriage and moves with her husband Glen to California. Flashback chapters offer background story that help the reader understand her strong character.

Phillips has crafted a very fine novel in Twig. The story jumps right in and grabs the reader’s attention from the beginning. Her writing style is very easy to read and maintains a good pace. The book is a coming of age tale and women’s fiction novel told as historical fiction, which keeps things interesting. Phillips does a good job balancing her themes, allowing focus to shift to different points of interest for many readers. This book would appeal to fans of women’s fiction, historical fiction and those interested in novels about family or conception problems. Unfortunately, this book isn’t yet in libraries, so you’ll have to purchase a copy to read, ebook available on Amazon.com for $2.99.

I received a copy of this book as a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. Thanks to the author/publisher for participating in the giveaway.

*If you’ve enjoyed reading Twig, you may be interested in The Fortunate Ones by Ellen Umansky (2017).

Book Review | Oola by Brittany Newell

Focusing on the relationship between two young twenty-somethings, Oola is an interesting character study. Americans Oola and Leif meet each other at a friend’s party abroad and then bounce around the world house sitting for months before ending up in a cottage on the California coast. Their mostly solitary lifestyle is low key, with the story presenting different aspects of each character more actively than pursuing a plot. While there certainly is a plot, it does not seem to be as integral to the story as are the characters. Oola is a beautiful blonde Californian, while Leif is more loosely defined as he tries to find his identity in those closest to him.

I found it surprising that this novel was written by a college student, which shows again that age is not a determinant of good writing. The book kept my interest despite the plot’s sometimes slow nature. It was a realistic portrayal of a romantic boy meets girl and falls in love story, with oddities instead of being trite. The book would appeal to those recovering from a broken heart, those struggling with bisexuality or transgender issues, or those who enjoy reading of obsessive love. With the book just being released earlier this week, it should be arriving at your local library soon! I received an advance reader’s edition of this book as a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. Thanks to the author/publisher for participating in the giveaway.

*If you’ve enjoyed reading Oola, you’ll likely enjoy White Fur by Jardine Libaire (2017). 

Book Review | The Book of Moon by George Crowder

book-of-moonThe Book of Moon follows high schooler Moon Landing through his parents divorce and their custody issues. Dealing with the divorce may be major, but Moon feels he has a host of other problems on his plate in this coming of age tale. Topics discussed include cute girls, Mom on the dating market, religion, skateboarding and others.

Many reviewers have noted the wry tone of this book. The writing style is very casual with Crowder often opting for the conversational tone instead of a grammatically correct sentence; a choice he has made to give more life to the young narrator’s voice. This coming-of-age narrator is meant to mature through the work, and Crowder is mostly successful here, except for a few spots where the progression of voice seems nonlinear. Overall an enjoyable read, I found the first half of the book kept my attention better than the second half. Chapter breaks are frequent making this book easy to pick up and put down, great for reading on public transit. Normally I’d give you a link to check the book out at your local library, but it’s not yet (11 Feb 17) listed in WorldCat. You can find a preview on GoodreadsI received a copy of this book as a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. My thanks to the author for participating in the giveaway.

Pictorials | San Francisco, California, USA – market month photo 25

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Wharf crab cleaning. 2015. San Francisco, California, USA.